Author Archive

“Rip What You Sew: Twenty-Five Years of Mixed Media Art with a Fiber Sensibility” with Lisa Kokin, Artist

January

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“Rip What You Sew: Twenty-Five Years of Mixed Media Art with a Fiber Sensibility” with Lisa Kokin, Artist

Saturday, January 21st, 2017, 10 a.m.
Koret Auditorium, de Young Museum

Admission: Free for current members of the TAC; $5 for students and members of FAMSF; $10 General Admission

Lisa Kokin makes art with recycled materials that she finds at flea markets, thrift stores, and recycling centers. She has worked with books, buttons, gut, photographs, thread, zippers and most recently with shredded money. Kokin’s work is often a critique of the socio-political status quo imbued with a healthy dose of levity and a keen sensitivity to materials and processes.

Sewing and fiber-related sensibilities play a key role in much of Kokin’s work, which she attributes to growing up in a family of upholsterers. Thread, which in the past she used to construct and embellish her work has, in her recent work, become a primary material. She explores irony and memory in her seemingly ephemeral pieces, allowing transiency itself to be immortalized in lasting works of art.

It is difficult to classify Lisa Kokin’s work. She is a conceptual artist, but few conceptual artists break as many boundaries in working with their materials. Her work has content, humor and social commentary, while maintaining a rigorous adherence to painstaking process.

Lisa Kokin lives and works in El Sobrante, California with her spouse Lia, three Chihuahua studio assistants and Bindi the cat. Kokin received her BFA and MFA from the California College of the Arts in Oakland, CA, and is the recipient of numerous awards and commissions, including the Dorothy Saxe Invitational Award for Creativity in Contemporary Arts from the Contemporary Jewish Museum, a WESTAF/NEA grant, and a Eureka Fellowship from the Fleishhacker Foundation. She maintains a thriving studio teaching practice, including critique groups, mentorships, workshops and classes.

Kokin’s work is in many private and public collections in the United States and abroad. She is represented by Seager Gray Gallery in Mill Valley, CA, Gail Severn Gallery in Ketchum, ID, Tayloe Piggott Gallery in Jackson, WY, Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, MA, and Craighead Green Gallery in Dallas, TX.

Learn more at www.lisakokin.com

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Exclusive TAC Member Batik Tour

October

batik-imageAn Exclusive Tour! Batik Tulis: Heirloom Textiles of Java

Presented by the Wine Country Collector and available only to TAC members.

Tour takes place in Sonoma.
Saturday, October 15, 2016
10 am–noon

Admission is limited and is $50 per person, payable to the Textile Arts Council.

Batik has been recognized by UNESCO as part of the “intangible” cultural heritage of Indonesia. This presentation will center on the batik traditions on the island of Java. The tour will examine two dozen stellar vintage colonial era batiks from a prominent private textiles collection along with a small sampling of other Indonesian textile masterpieces. A Batik expert from Indonesia will guide the tour.

Batik making in Indonesia is a living tradition with deep historical roots. The batik process was revolutionized in the early 19th century with the introduction of imported machine-loomed ground cloth. This allowed the fullest expression of Javanese artistry. Prestigious public collections of batik are found in the Netherlands, Germany and the United States as well as Indonesia.

For more information, please contact tac@famsf.org.

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The Roots

November

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The Roots: Engaging Social Sculpture 

With Latifa Medjdoub, Artist
Saturday, November 12th, 2016, 10 a.m.
Koret Auditorium, de Young Museum

Admission: Free for current members of the Textile Arts Council
$5 for students and members of the FAMSF, $10 General Admission

This lecture explores the possibilities of flexible sculpture as social practice engaging communities in a personal exploration and social connection.
The Roots is a site-specific, handcrafted, interactive fiber sculpture inspired by nature and employing a stunning ensemble of innovative fiber art and sculptural works, many of which were originally developed with varied communities as social art projects and have subsequently been part of installations, workshops, and performances around the region, including at the French American International School, The Old Mint, the San Francisco International Arts Festival, Alonzo King Lines Ballet and the Museum of Performance and Design.

After a brief historic of her previous experiences in diverse textile and art related industries, Latifa Medjdoub will engage on the topic of ‘The Roots principles as a unique tool to generate creative personal connections and inspire new reflections on larger social constructions.’

Born in France, Latifa Medjdoub is a San Francisco based artist. Her mediums include social art sculpture and installations, photography, painting and performance. Central themes of her work raise questions of identity, social roles, and the metatheatricality that shapes Humanity.

Educated at the École Supérieure des Arts Appliqués et du textile of Roubaix, France, Medjdoub collaborated with leading artists in the performing arts and performing industry. Her critically acclaimed work has been shown in museums and galleries in Europe, Asia, and North America including the Museum of Art and Industry, Roubaix France; Cheongju Art Center, Korea; De Cordova Museum, MA; Santa Fe Art institute, NM; National Building Museum, DC; Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum, TX; Fort Mason, San Francisco; The Museum of Performance and Design, San Francisco CA.

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Social Fabric

October

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Social Fabric 

With Karen Hampton, mixed-media textile artist
Saturday, October 8th, 2016, 10 a.m.
Koret Auditorium, de Young Museum

Admission: Free for current members of the Textile Arts Council
$5 for students and members of the FAMSF, $10 General Admission

I am a conceptual artist working with narrative storytelling and re-memory. My artwork is steeped in oral history and is an expression of the unconscious. I think of myself as a griot (storyteller), I impart conceptualized stories about the “other” in society. Whether reflecting on my childhood or my visions of my ancestors’ lives, my goal is always to stand up for the under-represented and tell an expanded American story. I believe every time my weft crosses the warp or my needle pierces the cloth, I reach through another layer of the scorched earth that slavery has left behind and revealed another bit of our collective historical conscience.

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Annual Textile Bazaar

October

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ANNUAL TEXTILE BAZAAR

October 9th, 2016 10a.m.-4p.m.
Moriarty Hall, St. Anne of the Sunset Church
1300 Funston (at Judah), San Francisco, 94122

Our annual Textile Bazaar is a truly unique event, hosting a vendor mix that offers a wide range of textiles, jewelry, and home accessories from around the world and from the creative community within the Bay Area. Save the date, October 9, and join us once again for a very special Textile Arts Council event.

There are currently a few vendor tables still available. Please contact Shirley.juster@gmail.com  for details.

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Kitsch to Art Moderne: Meisen Kimono in the First Half of Twentieth Century Japan

September

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Kitsch to Art Moderne: Meisen Kimono in the First Half of Twentieth Century Japan 

With Yoshiko Wada
Saturday, September 17th, 2016, 10 a.m.
Koret Auditorium, de Young Museum

Admission: Free for current members of the Textile Arts Council
$5 for students and members of the FAMSF, $10 General Admission

When Japan opened its doors to the West during the Meiji Restoration in 1868, the former feudal society experienced an influx of foreign culture. The resulting industrial revolution stimulated the textile industry and created a border consumer market including “commoners” who were once restricted from wearing silk or colorful kimonos. This new market created a sudden blossoming of popular designs for kimono, haori, winter baby wraps, and futon. Popularly called “meisen,” these fabrics and products were produced in great quantities across Japan during the first part of the twentieth century.

Meisen generally indicates silk cloth patterned by printing or ikat resist dyeing its warp or weft. These relatively inexpensive and visually dazzling textiles gained special popularity among lower and middle class women. The designs reflected consumer taste, fashion trends, and social phenomena.
A strong public interest in things Western and exotic, considered “modern” or “mod,” resulted in a visible popular aesthetic that set meisen textiles apart. Despite popularity, after World War II meisen production virtually disappeared due to a rapid decline in demand for inexpensive kimono which were replaced by Western clothing.

The contrast between meisen and other Japanese traditional textiles continues to puzzle contemporary viewers in Japan and abroad. By examining meisen designs we can gain perspective on the social and cultural background, consumer psychology, and technical information surrounding Japanese textile production in the early twentieth century.

Yoshiko Iwamoto Wada is an artist, author, exhibition curator, textile researcher and film producer and has long been an exponent of traditional and sustainable practices in fashion and textile production. She travels throughout the world giving lectures and workshops, and participates in conferences to build greater insight into the world of fiber and textiles. Yoshiko is president of the World Shibori Network and founder of Slow Fiber Studios. She has co-chaired all nine International Shibori Symposium (ISS) as well as upcoming 10thISS in Oaxaca, Mexico. She conducted textile research globally including in Japan, India, and USA funded by the Japan Foundation, Indo-US Sub-commission for Education

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Weave and Stitch to Sape Music

July

Edric Ong Weave and Stitch to Sape Music, Celebrating Ikat and Embroidery
With Asif Shaikh and Edric Ong

Saturday, July 2, 2016, 10 a.m.

Koret Auditorium, de Young Museum

Admission: $5 for TAC Members, Students and FAMSF Members
$10 General Admission

Revival and Promotion of Indian Hand Embroidery
Asif Shaikh’s (Ahmedabad) lifelong mission is to save Indian crafts from fading into oblivion. He advances the art of embroidery and propels it to another level of craftsmanship and beauty. In the past two decades, he has revamped tools and techniques, developed new stitches & introduced miniature styles, blended traditional and contemporary designs & colors, supported & trained local artisans, & promoted education and appreciation for the art nationally and internationally. In 2008, the Victoria & Albert Museum, asked Asif to revive their Mughal embroidery pieces. Asif specializes in the 18th century aari embroidery that was produced by the royal courts. He was also asked by UNESCO Parzor in India to revive their parsi gara embroidery.

World Ikat Textiles . . . ties that bind
Edric Ong (Sarawak) is internationally known as a designer, textile artist, author, curator of exhibitions, and especially for his championing of natural dyes and materials, His life’s work is to help keep craft traditions alive. He is Senior VP of the Asia Pacific Region of the World Craft Council and works with World Crafts Council-UNESCO on the Award of Excellence for Handicrafts program. He was the Malaysian designer of the Year in 2009, won the Aid to Artisans Advocate Award in 2005. He was recently awarded the Mercedes Benz/STYLO Global Fashion Influence Award 2016 at the Asian Fashion Festival.

Join TAC and our guests  for a Trunk show and Artisan demonstrations on Sunday, July 3rd at Krimsa Fine Rugs from 12 -5 pm
2190 Union Street, San Francisco, CA 94123

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Textile Arts Council members visit the Philippines

Textile Arts Council members visit the Philippines

By Leslee Budge

T'Boli weaverFor over sixteen days our group from the Textile Arts Council traveled the full length of the Philippines archipelago from Laoag city in northern Luzon, the large island on which Manila is situated, to General Santos, on the southern island of Mindanao. Here we drove to remote T’boli villages near Lake Sebu. We also visited numerous cities on the island of Panay.

Moving thought out this island nation, we stopped at the workshops of indigenous weavers from different cultural groups using fibers as diverse as abaca or banana fibers, pina or pineapple fibers, cotton, silk and cotton polyester. We were fortunate to have the assistance of members of the Custom Made Crafts Center, a Filipino non-governmental organization working towards improved quality of life for forest-dependent communities, in setting up demonstrations at the many workshops we visited.

On the island of Mindanao around Lake Sebu live the T’boli ‘dream weavers’—so called because they dream of the patterns they will weave. As in many cultures there is mythology and sacred significance linked to the t’nalak cloth that they weave. For our first visit, we walked 45 minutes to the small village of Lamkanidang, with threatening thunder clouds closing in. Just as the skies opened up in a cloud-burst we reached the bamboo, thatched roofed house where the weavers were awaiting us. Here we were given a PowerPoint presentation about their culture. Afterwards we saw the full process from harvesting the abaca; removing the fibers from the banana stock, drying; tying the stands to make long filaments; tying the fibers for the tie-dye process to create the ikat pattern; dyeing the yarns; preparing the warp (the fibers that compose the length of the fabric); putting the warp on the back-strap loom and finally the weaving process. This demonstration of the process of weaving was repeated in many of the workshops we visited.

From Mindanao we flew north to Laoag city, visiting museums then driving south and back towards Manila. Passing through Paoay we stopped at the Inabel weavers. The art of Inabel weaving is handed down from generation to generation. Next we stopped at the workshop of Magdalena Gamayo, a National Living Treasure awardee for Inabel weaving. Born in 1924, she has been weaving since the age of 16. She continues weaving, teaching and inspiring others to follow her path.

Our next flight took us to the city of Kalibo on Panay island where we learned about creating pina cloth. Pina is made of the leaf fibers from a variety of pineapple. The fiber is very fine—the finished fabric is like a fine silk organza. This art nearly died out 30 or so years ago but has been revived. Like abaca, the fibers are striped from the plant source to create pina fiber. The cloth is woven using silk for the warp and pina for the weft. Pina is used to make the Filipino men’s shirt, barong, and women’s dresses which are still worn for formal State events. Elaborate embroidery is often used to embellish this luxury cloth.

We drove south to the city of Iloilo. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Iloilo was known as the Queen of the South, exporting Manila hemp and hablon, a cotton cloth, woven by the people living in and around Iloilo. During the Spanish time, in the 1800s, Iloilo was known as the ‘Textile Center of the Philippines’. Hablon is a heritage industry in Iloilo. The making of hablon is not just a means of livelihood, it is also a culture, a tradition, an irreplaceable fragment in the whole that is Iloilo. Unfortunately, nowadays it is impossible to find a pure cotton hablon cloth, since the poly-cotton yarns are more affordable. Neither cotton nor silk are grown to any large extent in the Philippines.

Throughout our tour we used Manila as a base. While there we had the opportunity to meet with members of HABI, the Philippine Textile Council who graciously briefed us on the variety of textile we would be seeing and their significance in Philippine cultural life.

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Travel

Travel & Learn

Travel with TAC to learn about textiles in the countries where they are created.
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Ethnic Studies

Ethnic Studies

Ethnic Textiles Study Group is a wonderful way to see, touch and learn about textiles from around the world.
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Get Involved

Get Involved

Join our vibrant and creative community and enjoy the benefits of TAC membership.
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Obiko Archive

Obiko Archive

The Obiko Artwear Archive documents Bay Area clothing and jewelry designers from the 1970’s through the 1990’s.
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